It’s been several months since the last router-related blog post, we were busy finalizing the prototypes and preparing for two Lie-Nielsen events we just wrapped up in Philly and Cinci.  So a quick status on the tools: pre-orders are now available on our site as most of you know already and we’re just waiting on our final pattern changes to come in so we can place our production order at the foundry.  We will soon be finishing our cutter prototype and ramping up production on everything else.  Tools are set to begin shipping in June.

Now for the overview of blade positioning in the 2500 router.  This is by far the most distinguishing feature of the 2500 when compared to the #71 that Stanley made so popular.  With the 71, the blade mounts in the center and can, in certain versions of the tool, be mounted on the back of the center post to give an open throat or bullnose style setup.  Preston’s 2500P could mount the blade in four locations: standard closed throat, reverse open throat (or bullnose), inboard of the right-hand post, and outboard of the left-hand post.  When mounted on the left or right-hand post, the cutter could only face to the left, perpendicular to the standard direction of cutting.  This allowed the tool to be pushed sideways, presumably for working on narrower edges or in situations where a short-wide sole interfered with something on the work piece but and long-narrow sole did not.

Cutter in the standard closed-throat position

blade in the standard closed-throat position

Cutter in open throat position

Blade in open throat position

Inboard position on right-hand post

Inboard position on right-hand post

Outboard position on left-hand post

Outboard position on left-hand post

The WMT 2500 router maintains the same four blade positions, but we’ve added the ability to rotate the cutter in 90 deg increments when positioned on the left or right-hand posts.  This allows the user to hang to tool over an edge and make sweeping cuts, such as when working with tenons.  Many woodworkers have done this with the 71, but you can only go out about 1.5″ before the tool becomes unstable.  Then the standard practice is to support the other end of the tool with a block of wood that matches the height of your work piece so the tool doesn’t tip… of course problems arise if the support block isn’t exactly the same thickness of your work piece.  You also have to take the time to get a piece of scrap and size it accordingly.  With the 2500, you can simply move the blade to the side position, rotate the cutter 90 deg, and hanging the tool out 5″ or more is no problem.

Cleaning up a large tenon with the cutter rotated in the outboard position

Cleaning up a large tenon with the cutter rotated in the outboard position.  Note how well the tool is supported on the work piece despite the fact that this tenon is over 2.5″ long.

Before wrapping this up there are a few details I’d like to point out.  First is simply that the cutter shown in these pictures is not our production design.  We are still finishing the prototype and will cover that in more detail once it’s ready.  Second is that the minimum depth of cut is limited when the blade is in the outer post positions AND rotated 90 deg.  The tip of the cutter needs to stick down almost 3/16″ so that the top of the cutter clears the sole of the tool.  At first glance you might think, “Why not machine a pocket into the body of the tool that the cutter recess into?” And that’s a fair question.  Here’s why we left it alone.  Machining into the sole that deep and that wide breaks through the inner corner of the casting and looks awful.  Adding more material in that area to prevent this also looks confusing and poorly designed.  Next is cost.  Milling a pocket in the side of the tool would require another setup and more time which means more money.  But the final and most important reason for not bringing the cutter higher into the body is because it really didn’t seem necessary.  Small shoulders (less than 3/16″ deep) are typically found on smaller scale work where the tenons don’t stick out very far, simply use the tool in its normal configuration.  Long tenons, where you’d want to move the blade out and overhang the work piece quite a distance, are typically found on larger scale work which means the shoulder will generally be 1/4″ deep or more and the minimum depth of cut won’t pose any problems.

Until next time,
-WMT

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4 comments

  1. Gavin says: March 17, 2016