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In:In the Shop, Vintage Tool Talk

Comments Off on Restoring a Mead Belt Sander- Part 2

Things have progressed nicely with the sander.  The base is now finished, the sander and motor are mounted, and the wiring is installed, all that remains is the modification and installation of the sanding deck itself.  I did re-design the switch box since my last entry, here’s why:  My original box was small and clean looking (which I liked) but it didn’t allow access to the switch once everything was installed.  This may or may not be fine for my lifetime, but sooner or later something will come loose, the switch will die, a wire will get cut and need replacing… something, and at that point I would need to destroy the old switch box, make the repairs, and install a new custom box.  Eventually this bothered me enough to design a switch box with a removable cover plate.  It’s larger than my first box and has four screws holding the front plate on, but I think it’s for the best and I’m happy with how it looks.  I’ll let the pictures do the rest of the talking until my third and final entry on this restoration project.

Old and new switch boxes.

Old and new switch boxes.

Unfinished base, simple (but classy) chamfers.

Unfinished base, simple (but classy) chamfers.

Relief notch where the motor cord rubs against the edge.  Without this, the cord and/or edge would be worn through over time due to the vibration of the sander when running.

Relief notch where the motor cord rubs against the edge. Without this, the cord and/or edge would be worn through over time due to the vibration of the sander when running.

Finished wire hold-downs.

Finished wire hold-downs.

Wire path on the underside of the base.

Wire path on the underside of the base.

Motor mounted

Motor mounted

Completed switch box installed.  Nice.

Completed switch box installed. Nice.

Everything finished... except the sanding deck.

Everything finished… except the sanding deck.

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