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In:In the Shop, Vintage Tool Talk

Comments Off on A Custom Fishtail Chisel

We make winding sticks… lots of them.  Each set has four trapezoidal pieces of inlay, each with two sharp corners that need to be cleared out.  So for a batch of 50 sets of sticks I have 400 corners to clear.  Thus far I have used my Lie-Nielsen 3/8″ fishtail chisel, but it’s too narrow and the fishtail angle is too shallow to really reach the corners, so I have to reach down from above and scoop out the waste.  It works, but it’s not ideal.

My first thought was to buy their largest size chisel (5/8″), but I scoped it out at the Lie-Nielsen event in Brooklyn a few weeks back and found it was also too narrow and too shallow on the side angles to give me what I wanted.  I decided to try modifying a vintage chisel if I could find one suitable for the job, so here’s the rundown:

I found this Stanley chisel (with steel through the entire body) which had been ground down quite a ways for $9.  Normally I wouldn’t want to pay even $9 for a chisel that was so short, but for this task where I want to be closer to the work it was perfect.  The steel running through the handle also puts good weight in the hand and balances the tool nicely, so $9 was worth it.

The chisel as purchased, prepare to be decimated.

I painted on some machinist layout fluid, scratched in some general guide lines to grind to, and started hogging off material.  I’ve had a few people as about the risk of removing the temper from the steel during this process so I want to address that up front.  To avoid ruining the steel, you need to avoid over heating it.  This starts by using fresh abrasives.  I was grinding with a freshly dressed grinding wheel from Norton.  I held the tool with my bare hands so I could feel when it started to warm up, then I cooled it in water.  I also don’t grind up by the tip of the tool, this material is so thin that it will heat up too quickly and be ruined.  Any final grinding of the tip was done by hand on sandpaper and finished on waterstones.

Heavy material removal completed from the bench grinder. Time for the belt sander.

When I had the sides brought in I needed to refine the shape so I switched to my belt sander outfitted with metal grinding belts (Alumina Zirconia).  This worked extremely well and was basically trial-and-error process.  I’d grind some metal, check my progress, draw new target lines occasionally, and grind some more.  Eventually I got the shape I wanted and went from a 40 grit belt to an 80.  Refined things a bit further, then polished it up with a 220 grit belt.

My restored belt grinder… too pretty to just grind metal on, so I covered the walnut with some thick paper to avoid getting metal embedded in the wood.  Worked like a charm.

Shape being refined on the belt sander.

After the grinding was finished, I hand filed a few areas and then sharpened the blade.  I started with sandpaper as this was the initial sharpening/flattening of the tool.  After sanding up to 320 grit I switched to my waterstones and polished the tool up to 8,000 grit.  This was a freehand operation given the shape of the tool doesn’t really fit the standard sharpening jigs.  I use the sharpening jigs whenever possible and am not ashamed to admit it, but I can freehand when necessary.

The finished tool compared to my 3/8″ Lie-Nielsen. I had a slight ding on the bevel near the cutting edge, but it’s not at the cutting edge and will be ground off in future sharpenings. I didn’t remove it now because I’d be wasting several sharpenings over a small cosmetic flaw.

The chisel being used as designed. You can see that it can reach all the way to the corner of the inlay pocket and still has a little clearance between the chisel and the pocket’s side wall.

I tried the chisel out briefly and it works brilliantly.  Overall it took $9 and between three and four hours of work, and that’s from the time the tool was untouched to completely finished.  I did give the handle a quick sanding and refinishing, but nothing fancy and now it’s ready for years of service.  Time to get some work done.

-WMT

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In:On the Road

Comments Off on Back from Brooklyn

We’re back from our first Lie-Nielsen event.  Being a guest demonstrator was a lot of fun and we were able to meet several enthusiastic woodworkers, many of whom follow us on instagram (@walkemooretools).  It’s always nice to put real faces to the virtual identities shared through instagram, so thanks for making the effort to come see us.

In addition to the Lie-Nielsen staff, we were also able to meet several other woodworking professionals for the first time including Matt Kenney (from Fine Woodworking Mag), Christopher Schwarz, and the folks from Tools for Working Wood.  Overall it was a great time and if you ever have a chance to attend a Lie-Nielsen event, I encourage you get there.

-WMT

Saws by Blackburn Tools

Large veneer saw, hardware kit sold by Blackburn Tools

 

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In:Random

Comments Off on WMT- Wizard of New York

Whilst browsing the world-wide-web in relation to Walke Moore Tools, I came across a brief article in a language I didn’t recognize. I clicked on it and after google translated the text, I learned some interesting information about WMT I thought I should share.First: We are apparently making planes now. Second: I’m female. Third: We are “Wizards of New York” (I’m okay with that one). Fourth: We make saws and rulers. Fifth: We were upgraded from “Wizards of New York” to “Masters of America” (that might be too much pressure).

In all fairness I’m sure a few things were lost in translation, but I find it interesting that our small company is popping up online around the world after barely two years of being in business (I believe this was written in Montenegro based on the web extension).  So thanks again for all the support, it means a lot to us.

-WMT

 

 

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In:On the Road

Comments Off on WMT in Brooklyn

WMT will be a guest demonstrator at the Lie-Nielsen event in Brooklyn from Jan 2nd-3rd, 2015.  This promises to be an exciting show with a slew of talented demonstrators, plus all the Lie-Nielsen swag you can handle.  So head out to the big apple for New Year’s Eve, take Jan 1st to recover, then enjoy some sweet hand tools on the 2nd and 3rd.  More info available here.

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In:In the Shop

Comments Off on Router plane rabbets

When fitting a dovetail joint I cut the tails first, align the tail-board over the pin-board, and transfer the tails with a marking knife.  Pretty straightforward, but it can be tricky keeping the joint aligned while transferring the tails to the pin-board.  If the tail-board is cooked the drawer/case/etc will be racked when assembled, there will also be gaps at the joint’s baseline.  If the tail-board is square, but slides a little forward or back relative to the baseline the joint will have gaps or may not assemble at all.  Finally, if the board is perfectly aligned to begin with but then shifts while marking… good luck realigning.

For all these reasons, I put a small rabbet on the tail-board which creates a barely visible shoulder.  This shoulder slides against the pin-board and instantly aligns everything except the sides of the boards, but that’s simple to do.  If you don’t rabbet your boards already, you should.  At least give it a shot.  Once you decide to use the rabbet you have to figure out how to make it.  The generic answer for a large number of joints is to set up a table saw or router.  That works great, but for working on a few joints (making a box or just a couple drawers) it’s faster by hand.  Since you’re cutting a rabbet, it makes sense to reach for a rabbet plane or fillister.  After all, this technique is known as “the 140 trick” named after the model #140 block plane often used to cut the rabbet.  These planes work well for larger cases or drawers, but I find them completely unsuited when working with narrow parts.  The planes can be sensitive to set up and a narrow board doesn’t give much surface area for the plane to rest on or the fence to register against.  Clamping small pieces securely for use with a rabbet plane can also be a challenge.

Enter the router plane.  I typically have two boards (a left and right side) to rabbet, so I lay them next to each other on the bench, throw a clamp on the back side and let the front register against a bench dog or some other backstop.  Using the router plane, I support half of the tool on each board (which should be the same thickness), set the depth with extreme simplicity and accuracy, and cut across the grain to my baseline.  The baseline is already cut into the board with a marking gauge as part of the dovetailing process so no extra work there, but you do have to be careful not to cut across the baseline.  This may sound difficult, but I’ve never had an issue.  The knifeline from the marking gauge severs the fibers should cut deep enough that as the router plane gets close the fibers simply lift up and fall off.  When all is said and done I find this approach far superior for narrow components.  Less tool set up time, no risk of tipping the tool resulting in a non-square rabbet, and work holding is much easier.  If that’s doesn’t convince you, check out the video of the technique in action, then give it a try.

Enjoy, -WMT

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In:Our Tools

Comments Off on Magne-clips for Winding Sticks

For some time we have been considering various ways to clip our winding sticks together for storage purposes.  Some traditional designs use a peg-in-hole method where one stick has two pegs protruding out of it and, you guessed it, the other stick has matching holes.  Fit the pegs to the holes and the sticks hold each other reasonably well.  We weren’t crazy about this design for two reasons:  it’s not very attractive (in our opinion) and as the pegs and/or holes wear, their hold becomes less effective.  We also considered some classy leather straps or end caps, but the added cost was a deterrent, as was the bulk it would add to an otherwise narrow set of sticks that would typically to be stored in a tool chest or on a shelf.

In the end, we designed our own method of holding the sticks together using rare earth magnets.  Each stick gets a pair of magnets set just below the woods surface.  The back of the hole is filled with a matching face-grain plug that typically goes unnoticed (unless you’re looking for it of course).  The end result is a pair of winding sticks that looks as clean and beautiful as our standard pair, but put the faces together and they hold each other with just the right amount of force.  (check out a brief video here)

Enjoy, -WMT

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In:On the Road

Comments Off on A great time in Winston-Salem

WMT just returned from an action packed weekend in Winston-Salem, NC, which hosted Woodworking in America for 2014.  This was our first show, but thanks to a strong presence from the Instagram woodworking community, it felt like we were old pros.  We were located within a booth or two from several popular and/or up and coming tool makers who we’ve known through Instagram for some time, but were able to meet in person for the first time this weekend.  (Check out their sites and their instagram profiles: Texas Heritage, Sterling Tool Works, Caleb James Planemaker, Peter Galbert, Scott Meeks Woodworks, & Plate 11 Bench Co)

We had a great time, met countless enthusiastic woodworkers (who were very gracious with their feedback on our tools), and drank some of the local brew (which was delicious).  If you didn’t make it this year, try for next year.  It’s worth the effort.

Setup:

The WMT booth along side Texas Heritage and Sterling Tool Works, Thursday night.

Our main display table.

Lie-Nielsen

Lee Valley

They’re not for the power-free woodworker, but Bosch really seems to be stepping up their power-tools-for-woodworkers game.

The night life after setting up on Thursday.

The Show:

Finally got a look at Lie-Nielsen’s sharpening jig. Not yet released, but I’ll be buying it asap.

Got to try out a few of Caleb James’ wooden planes, very nice.

Blue Spruce had a few new tools to test out as well.

Chris from Sterling Tool Works at his bench, lots of goodies to play with (including his new bench).

Travishers by Claire Minihan (pictured), find them on Peter Galbert’s site.

Lee Valley announced a new line of modular planes. You pick the handle type (two styles, three sizes each), knob style (three to choose from), frog angle, and blade material (O1, A2, or PMV11)

…and an interesting display to try out the various tote and knob configurations so you can decide what’s best for you.

An infill plane by Juan Vergara, the first of his I’d seen in person.

The Instagrammers:

Despite all the great tools and woodworkers, the best part of WIA14 for us was meeting all our fellow instagrammers in person.

Todd Nebel was there for the show… and walked away with the Jet bandsaw door prize. Not bad.

Marco Terenzi brought some of his miniatures… I’m not jealous at all of how little time it would take to flatten that bench, except that I am.

Bradley Workshop’s guitar was on display and put to use briefly mid-show thanks to…

…Anne of all trades.

See you next year. -WMT

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In:News, On the Road, Our Tools

Comments Off on WMT at Woodworking in America 2014

 

 

 

In just a few days WMT will be on the tool floor of Woodworking in America.  This is our first public event with a fair amount of preparation leading up to this point, but we’re excited and will be sharing a booth with some other premium tool makers who are also relatively new to the woodworking world.  We will be side-by-side with Sterling Tool Works and Texas Heritage Woodworks with several other makers very near by such as Blue Spruce Toolworks, Vesper Tools, Scott Meeks Woodworks, Plate 11 Bench Co. and the list goes on.  So if you’re at the show be sure to stop over and say hi.  We’ll have some tools available for sale at the show, other new tools and prototypes to try out and pre-order, and all unfilled orders placed at the show will ship for free.  Hope to see you there.

-WMT

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In:In the Shop, Vintage Tool Talk

Comments Off on Restoring a Mead Belt Sander- Part 3

The Chicago manufactured Mead belt sander is finally finished.  It took a while as I was working on it between other jobs and trying to prepare for Woodworking in America, but it was worth the wait.  Picking up where the last blog entry left off, the only thing I had left to finish was the sanding deck.  This is my one complaint with the design of the sander, the entire deck has to be removed to change the belt.  The belt change itself couldn’t be simpler: push the head of the sander down, slide the old belt off, slide the new belt on, release the head.  It literally takes me 10 seconds to swap belts… except every time I do I have to unscrew the wing nut from underside of the deck, the swap belts, put the deck back on, re-thread the wing nut to its post (you don’t loosen it, you have to remove the nut completely), then get my square, make sure the deck is square to the belt, lock it down, and put my square away.  It turns a 10 second operation into a couple minutes.  This may sound trivial, but I intend to use this sander for working with wood and metal and I have several belt types and grits to suit my needs.  I want to change belts quickly and get back to work.  I also don’t want to take the chance that the deck isn’t square to the belt every time I change a belt.  My solution was to modify the casting that supports the wooden deck by cutting off the inside portion to the right of the belt.  I hate to hack up the castings on a vintage piece of equipment, I can’t just go buy a new one if I don’t like my finished product, but in this case the benefits outweigh the risks and hack it up I did.  I opened up a slot just wide enough to slip the belt off, slide it through the back of the decking, and then replace with a new belt in the same fashion.  This was completely worth doing in my opinion and I couldn’t be happier with the finished product now that I’ve had a chance to take it for a spin.

No room to get the belt out without removing the entire deck. I marked out the area I wanted to cut away, used a hack saw rough it out, then filed the rough cuts to their final finish and location.

Casting cut apart.

The restored sander now up and running.  I finished the walnut with Watco Danish Oil followed by a few coats of wipe-on polyurethane followed by wax.  A lot of people seem to have the impression I’m going to all this effort to keep the tool shut away in pristine condition.  Let me assure you, I will be putting this thing to work without reservation.  But whenever possible, I think restoring a tool like this is more than just an exercise in fashionably toolery.  Going through every part reveals a lot of hidden flaws in the tool (in this project alone I found the tilted deck, frayed wiring in the old switch box, a poorly aligned drive belt, and a non-flat sole to the sander casting) as well as several cosmetic (cracked wooden base, ugly switch box, and poor wiring path).  You also gain an intimate knowledge of the tool, just like restoring your first hand plane, that will help you understand the strengths and weaknesses of each tool you own and how to use them most appropriately to yield the best possible results.  Now let me step down from my soap box and show the finished product.  Enjoy.

Finished sanding deck.

Deck is now square to the belt. Notice the slot to the right of the belt for quick belt changes without needing to remove the deck.

The completed belt sander in all its simple glory.

As for the belts, I ordered a wide range from Klingspor.  The blue are Alumina Zirconia for grinding metal, the yellow are Aluminum Oxide with “gold coating” which can be used for wood or metal, and the brown belts are basic Aluminum Oxide wood belts.  I purchased a few grit levels of each style.  I also purchased a linen belt that can be loaded with a honing compound in case we end up selling marking knives or something similar where several identical edges need to be honed quickly, this might prove very useful.

Various 1″x42″ Klingspor belts for abrading wood and metal, as well as a linen belt for honing.

Finally, here’s a shot of the motor specifications for those who care about such things. (And now I have to get back to prepping for WIA)

Sunlight motor

-WMT

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In:In the Shop, Vintage Tool Talk

Comments Off on Restoring a Mead Belt Sander- Part 2

Things have progressed nicely with the sander.  The base is now finished, the sander and motor are mounted, and the wiring is installed, all that remains is the modification and installation of the sanding deck itself.  I did re-design the switch box since my last entry, here’s why:  My original box was small and clean looking (which I liked) but it didn’t allow access to the switch once everything was installed.  This may or may not be fine for my lifetime, but sooner or later something will come loose, the switch will die, a wire will get cut and need replacing… something, and at that point I would need to destroy the old switch box, make the repairs, and install a new custom box.  Eventually this bothered me enough to design a switch box with a removable cover plate.  It’s larger than my first box and has four screws holding the front plate on, but I think it’s for the best and I’m happy with how it looks.  I’ll let the pictures do the rest of the talking until my third and final entry on this restoration project.

Old and new switch boxes.

Unfinished base, simple (but classy) chamfers.

Relief notch where the motor cord rubs against the edge. Without this, the cord and/or edge would be worn through over time due to the vibration of the sander when running.

Finished wire hold-downs.

Wire path on the underside of the base.

Motor mounted

Completed switch box installed. Nice.

Everything finished… except the sanding deck.